Why I don’t want you to Innovate: the paradox of innovation

Guest Blog: Director, Innovation and Strategic Partnerships – Elliot Fung

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The word ‘innovation’ means different things to different people. Most organizations and leaders say that they want to be more innovative, or lead innovation, however to truly innovate means you have to be willing to think differently, produce and deliver in ways you aren’t likely equipped to do, take risks, bend the rules, and leap frog the status quo.

In truth, most organizations, governments, businesses and leaders are pretty much the opposite; they are successful in their industry because they set the rules, follow the rules, and deliver on incremental improvements that seem innovative, but are in reality only steps ahead of what they currently deliver on today. To be an innovator, especially in health care, ‘steps ahead’ isn’t good enough for patients – you must be willing to take risk, create a totally new paradigm, and most importantly leap frog the status quo. As a patient, I don’t want just better care for my grandmother, I want the best care possible.

So, I don’t want you to innovate. Yes, we need innovation to provide sustainable solutions to our vast health care challenges, like reducing emergency department wait times or providing effective mental health care; we need innovation to help find ways to spend our precious health care dollars in more efficient ways; we need innovation to continually drive improvements in health for all residents to ensure equity, regardless if you live in the suburbs or on the street. I don’t want you to innovate, I want you to disrupt.

The transportation industry, much like health care, is complicated, very old, impacts everyone, and most notably, entrenched. For almost 100 years the taxi industry has operated around the world in a conveniently standardized way, customers had a basic expectation of service, accepted marginal experiences but almost always paid the full fare. Uber absolutely disrupted the transportation industry by introducing ride sharing – and gave riders the ability to rate the drivers, but importantly, gave drivers the ability to rate the passengers. This not only encourages better customer service, but improves the customer experience for everyone, at an average cost of 30% cheaper than a traditional taxi.   Now, Uber is often referred to as a gold-standard of disruptive innovation and is worth an estimated 40 billion dollars. It’s time to Uberize health care.

In our work as brokers, connectors and catalysts; connecting health innovators to the health system to test, pilot and adopt innovative technology and processes, and catalyzing opportunities to provide better care for patients, better patient experiences, and support and grow our innovation ecosystem in Waterloo Wellington, the WWLHIN recognizes that it takes leaders coming together from all sectors to drive these changes. Real innovation, disruptive innovation, in solving our biggest health and social issues will be realized through the deepest collaboration across health, technology, community, social services and government, when those sectors come together to not only lead together, but truly put patients first.

So I don’t want you to simply innovate, I want you to disrupt.

Elliot Fung
@elliotgfung

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#WeRally2021 for the Health and Wellbeing of Our Community

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When I introduce myself, I always start with three things. I am a dad. I coach soccer. And I’m the CEO of the Waterloo Wellington health system.

Sports has been an integral part of who I am my entire life. It teaches essential core values – dedication, perseverance, teamwork – and a whole lot about sweat equity.

It also has a value much greater in terms of health. When you hear about sports and health, an obvious connection is made between the benefits of physical activity and disease prevention. We all learned a long time ago from Hal Johnson and Joanne McLeod the importance of being active to keep fit and have fun!

A lesser known benefit is the connection between sports and one’s sense of community, also an important social determinant of health. Building a strong social network is key to one’s health – having people you can rely on to support you. Feeling connected and involved is also crucial for one’s mental health. There isn’t anything I wouldn’t do to support the kids I coach and mentor – something I learned from those who coached and mentored me through the years.

For me, sports has been a way to connect to my community and give back (outside of my day job) and I can’t think of a better way to build a sense of community though sports than by rallying together to host the 2021 Canada Summer Games.

This year, Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge, and the Region of Waterloo have come together to bid on the Games – competing against other communities like Niagara, Sudbury, and Ottawa.

The games bring with them investment in local sports infrastructure, more than $100 million in estimated economic activity for the host community, the opportunity to inspire and motivate our youth to get and stay active, and another way to bring Waterloo Region and the surrounding communities together.

A key criteria for winning the bid? Community Support. How do they measure community support? By the numbers. Let’s show the Bid Committee #whywaterlooregion. They arrive in town on February 28th to see what we’ve got to offer.

Join me in supporting the bid here. It takes only a minute to add your name. Then tell us why you rally and post your pic tagging @CanadaGames with #WeRally2021.

Bruce
@brucelauckner