Why I don’t want you to Innovate: the paradox of innovation

Guest Blog: Director, Innovation and Strategic Partnerships – Elliot Fung

City lights and head

The word ‘innovation’ means different things to different people. Most organizations and leaders say that they want to be more innovative, or lead innovation, however to truly innovate means you have to be willing to think differently, produce and deliver in ways you aren’t likely equipped to do, take risks, bend the rules, and leap frog the status quo.

In truth, most organizations, governments, businesses and leaders are pretty much the opposite; they are successful in their industry because they set the rules, follow the rules, and deliver on incremental improvements that seem innovative, but are in reality only steps ahead of what they currently deliver on today. To be an innovator, especially in health care, ‘steps ahead’ isn’t good enough for patients – you must be willing to take risk, create a totally new paradigm, and most importantly leap frog the status quo. As a patient, I don’t want just better care for my grandmother, I want the best care possible.

So, I don’t want you to innovate. Yes, we need innovation to provide sustainable solutions to our vast health care challenges, like reducing emergency department wait times or providing effective mental health care; we need innovation to help find ways to spend our precious health care dollars in more efficient ways; we need innovation to continually drive improvements in health for all residents to ensure equity, regardless if you live in the suburbs or on the street. I don’t want you to innovate, I want you to disrupt.

The transportation industry, much like health care, is complicated, very old, impacts everyone, and most notably, entrenched. For almost 100 years the taxi industry has operated around the world in a conveniently standardized way, customers had a basic expectation of service, accepted marginal experiences but almost always paid the full fare. Uber absolutely disrupted the transportation industry by introducing ride sharing – and gave riders the ability to rate the drivers, but importantly, gave drivers the ability to rate the passengers. This not only encourages better customer service, but improves the customer experience for everyone, at an average cost of 30% cheaper than a traditional taxi.   Now, Uber is often referred to as a gold-standard of disruptive innovation and is worth an estimated 40 billion dollars. It’s time to Uberize health care.

In our work as brokers, connectors and catalysts; connecting health innovators to the health system to test, pilot and adopt innovative technology and processes, and catalyzing opportunities to provide better care for patients, better patient experiences, and support and grow our innovation ecosystem in Waterloo Wellington, the WWLHIN recognizes that it takes leaders coming together from all sectors to drive these changes. Real innovation, disruptive innovation, in solving our biggest health and social issues will be realized through the deepest collaboration across health, technology, community, social services and government, when those sectors come together to not only lead together, but truly put patients first.

So I don’t want you to simply innovate, I want you to disrupt.

Elliot Fung
@elliotgfung

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