Waterloo Wellington LHIN Brings Clinicians Together for Critical Conversations

Guest Blog: Primary Care Physician Lead – Dr. Sabrina Lim Reinders

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Conversations are the cornerstone of practice. Only through conversation can we, as practitioners, discover the issues, pains, challenges and obstacles that patients face in order to assist them.

However, throughout our practice we may wonder what conversations should we be having with patients? How can we develop better relationships to support the patient experience?

To help answer some of these questions and more, the Waterloo Wellington LHIN recently hosted its annual Critical Conversations event. Critical Conversations is designed to encourage physicians, nurse practitioners, hospitalists and other health care providers to discuss the challenges they face and to learn new approaches to care from specialists and other practitioners.

By bringing health system leaders together, the Waterloo Wellington LHIN is supporting providers, enabling us to learn from each other to problem solve and better understand the challenges our colleagues face. This year’s Critical Conversations revealed important insights, with breakout sessions focusing on three main areas: newcomer health, advanced care planning and orthopedics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on shoulders.

I’d like to especially thank our facilitators Dr. Rachael Halligan, family physician, Regional Primary Care Lead for the Waterloo Wellington Regional Cancer Program, and Co-lead for Palliative Care, Dr. Michael Stephenson, family physician at Sanctuary Refugee Health Centre, Dr. Matthew Snider, orthopedic surgeon, and Dr. Chris Geddes, orthopedic surgeon, for sharing their expertise and answering complex questions about how clinicians can improve access and quality of care for their patients.

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Dr. Sabrina Lim Reinders welcomes attendees

Insights gained from the newcomer health breakout session included the need for a regional program to leverage the skills of experienced practitioners while building and increasing capacity. There is also a need to focus on relationship development with newcomers. Only by building trust with families and individuals are patients more willing to share their health histories, which will ultimately lead to more positive health outcomes.

Following newcomer health, the palliative care breakout session revealed the importance of initiating advanced care planning conversations with at risk or older patients, or at critical junctures, like surgeries. In addition, digital health solutions will likely be needed in order to share crucial end-of-life information with other health care professionals during care transitions.

The last breakout session focused on orthopedics and diagnostic imaging. Overall, there is a need for family practices to work with orthopedic surgeons to provide streamlined access to fracture clinics without having to go to emerge. Also, it is important to help manage patient expectations around what treatment will entail.

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Palliative Care breakout session

Through Critical Conversations 2017, many themes emerged as key areas for improvement. These insights will be used by the Waterloo Wellington LHIN to assist providers and increase efficiencies. By sharing insights and speaking with colleagues, we are working together to develop a more equitable and patient-focused health care system.

 

Sabrina Lim Reinders, Primary Care Physician Lead, WWLHIN

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